Isle of Dogs Review: A Ruff-around-the-edges treat for humans of all breeds

No Spoilers in this Review

Isle of Dogs is a surreal treat for humans of all breeds. Could this stop-motion dog-themed movie set in a future Japan be the flick to get the mercurial Wes Anderson some long-awaited mainstream adoration?

I saw this film at a Preview Screening at a local Picturehouse Cinema, the fantastic CinemaCity in Norwich.

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A cute canine cast – from Metro Weekly Full Link

Plot and Themes (No Spoilers)

The plot, as already outlined in the trailer, centres around a young boy called Atari who arrives on an island full of junk to find his lost dog Spots. It’s not a simple boy-and-dog story, however as Wes Anderson and his writing collaborators Roman Coppola and Jason Schwarzmann have created a pacy critique on contemporary political lunacy set 20 years in the future. The underlying premise is that a disease called Dog Flu forces a Japanese provincial government to quarantine and remove all canines from the mainland. Atari ends up befriending a group of dogs on this Trash Island, including a lovingly characterised antihero called Chief, a stray voiced by Bryan Cranston. The rest of the story mixes broadish political commentary brush-strokes with heartstring-tugging momentsin a beautifully-realised world which left me itching to stay in my seat for another viewing.

The dogs speak American English, though the humans in Megasaki speak Japanese using simple expressions (and no subtitles) which are designed for the viewer to “get the gist of”. This is a fascinating idea which almost works, though there just doesn’t seem to be any obvious reason for it. I do wonder whether Anderson could have predicted the social media uproar about stereotyping Japanese culture, however well-intentioned his homage appears to be.

Cultural appropriation aside, it is hard to avoid the word “quirky” when describing a Wes Anderson flick, and yes the film does have an eccentric narrative. But this is the closest I’ve ever felt emotionally engaged with a Wes Anderson film, where often I find his style and worldview a little too idiosyncratic to fully embrace the immersion his worlds entreat. In this offering, however, the emotional core of the film is studiously crafted, from the relationships between the human characters and between human and dog. There were a few sniffles in the theater.

Visuals
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A panorama of Megasaki – from It’s Nice That Full Link

The stop-motion visuals are, predictably, stunning to look at. Anderson brought over a sizeable portion of the visuals team from his first animated effort Fantastic Mr. Fox to create a fictional Megasaki City using 240 sets and 130,000 stills. The result is a beautifully handmade-style film, and even the piles of garbage in Trash Island conjure a minimalist beauty. Together with more standard cartoon animated elements used for television clips and intriguing takes on classic Japanese artwork seen in various backdrops, this film really is gorgeous to look at.

As with Anderson’s previous work, everything on screen has been meticulously selected for inclusion. Even if the amount of content on the screen is often Spartan, there is still not enough time to take in all the little screen delights, so most viewers will be looking forward to DVD and Blu-Ray releases in order to ingest all the delicious treats that Wes Anderson throws.

Performances
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A typically stellar group of actors for Wes Anderson – From Foxsearchlight.com Full Link

This director knows a lot of people. The cast-list for Wes Anderson films can be farcically imposing, and this film is true to form. Bill Murray, Edward Norton, Bryan Cranston, Jeff Goldblum, Scarlett Johansson, Harvey Keitel, Ken Watanabe, Greta Gerwig, Tilda Swinton… you get the picture. Special praise must go to young Canadian Koyu Rankin for his performance as 12-year-old Atari. As with Fantastic Mr. Fox, the voices of the actors resonate through the animated characters they portray and each role appears to be hand-crafted for the voice talent.

Soundtrack

If I’ve made it clear that the first star of this film are the visuals, the second is the music. There are classic tracks from Akira Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai and Drunken Angel films, together with psychedelic rock and swing jazz from the 1950s and 1960s. These are the dressing for a stunning original score from Alexandre Desplat, who just won an Oscar for his work on The Shape of Water. If you’ve heard his name prior to that, he also won an Oscar with another Anderson film The Grand Budapest Hotel. Taiko Drumming provides the centrepiece for the score, although there are some whimsical forays into dreamlike electronic music and more jazzy interludes. It is a triumph

Quirks
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Pro-Dog protestors in the fictional Japanese city of Megasaki – from technobuffalo.com Full link

The oddities in Wes Anderson films often provoke reactions similar to those toward a yeast extract spread. This film gave me moments of intense pleasure and annoyance, with the balance strongly in favour of the former. His labelling of items on the screen was pure pleasure for a cataloguing aficianado. As were the bizarre moments when characters wistfully looked into the distance. This happened once in the Fantastic Mr. Fox film when Mr.Fox suddenly stares at a wolf for no solid narrative reason. Why not? Similar scenes exist in this film, though not as indiscriminately.

Less successful was the reliance on sudden camera movements in the early parts of the film, whereby the only angle in which characters’ heads could move was 90 degrees, and usually in the direction of the viewer. It was the cinematic equivalent of the non-existent word überkook.

Overall
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Atari looks back at Rex, Boss and King – from thatericalper.com Full link

Anderson’s second animated offering is a cut above his first. It is a genuinely beautiful film which provides a lot of treats, though is ruff around the edges. The clumsy cultural tourism is outweighed by stunning visuals, fantastic performances and a beautiful soundtrack. Barring an upset, this ought to win the first Academy Award for Wes Anderson in 2019.

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I just wanted a mattress…

The health benefits of looking at videos of humours cats on facebook remain under-reported.  After a stressful day at work,  I was feasting on funny felines and generally enjoying life.

This put me in a relaxed mood, and a facebook advert of a mattress made me think “I really need a mattress for my flat”, as sleeping on the hard surface of a bed frame is uncomfortable.

The advert was for LEESA, a mattress which has three layers of foam! Support foam, memory foam and avena foam!  And it rolls in and and out a box!  Plus, I can try it for 100 nights and if I don’t want it they’ll just come round and pick it up again.

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I thought “I’m getting this mattress and nothing and nobody is going to stop me”. I clicked on the link and was about to order the mattress when another advert came up on my facebook , from a young lady with inhumanly white teeth and shiny eyes:

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This is the SIMBA, and has springs!

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It also comes in a handy little box, and also has a 100-night sleep guarantee! Weird huh? OK the shiny teeth have sold it to me. Click to order, but WAIT! Here’s another mattress-in-a-box and this one is yellow! It’s called EVE:

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I want it, because there aren’t enough yellow mattresses in the world. It’s also comprised of foam, has a 100-night sleep guarantee, and comes foldable in a box. That’s it, I’m sold, this one’s….. WTF?

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Another one?!? CASPER? Also foldable foam mattress in a box and with a 100-night trial?!? The lady is meditating with lots of white balloons, and it’s named after a fucking friendly ghost. How could I choose anything else? But what the hell there’s another ghost-themed foldable foam-filled bed around and it’s called GHOSTBED. Are you shitting me? This time it’s got a 101 night trial (like a mini Arabian-nights)

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This couple and their dog seem really happy about their Ghostbed.  A bit too happy… if you ask me.  They’re just having too much fun on a bed. These two look more serene in the scandinavian DREAM ZEBRA:

But if I’m getting a Scandinavian mattress, I want the world to know about it. What’s the point of getting something if it has a name, however cool it is, which doesn’t say “I’ve got Ice-Cold Scandinavian style”. Enter, 

HÜGGE:

You’ll be AMAZINGLY surprised that this mattress also is foldable, has layers of foam, and has a 100-night trial. But what about the similarly-featured OTTY? This young lady looks content, at least:

And she even has mini-mattresses for her dogs:

OK this is getting sillly now, maybe I should just stick with something simple, like BRUNO?

“Sir, is this another foam-filled foldable boxed mattress with a 100-night trial” you ask? Why yes. And the symbol is a bear. But do I really want to sleep on something called Bruno…? Not really. I prefer EMMA:

OK, I’m checking out. Life’s too short to spend so much time on foldable mattresses.  But there’s another one just as I’m about to check out FFS. And this is called THE MINISTRY OF SLEEP:

How can I ignore something called The Ministry of Sleep? It makes sleeping on a foldable foam-filled mattress delivered in a box with a 100 night guarantee sound more official.  OK i’ll… Oh COME ON….

I think I’ll sleep on the floor

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29th October: International Cyrus The Great Day

Happy International Cyrus The Great (600-530 BC) Day.

 

He practised tolerance of religion for all faiths within the Persian Empire, wrote the first international charter of human rights and freed the Jewish people to return to their homeland.

I hope world leaders of the current era understand and recognise the value of respecting their own people, and respecting others from around the world.

 

The Tomb of Cyrus The Great

 

The Cyrus Cylinder: First International Charter of Human Rights

 

 

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Saudi Arabia’s takeover of British politics will be complete with the Tory-DUP Coalition

Saudi Arabia’s takeover of British politics is complete following the Tory-DUP coalition (as they have a more direct financial link with the DUP).

DUP Referendum campaign funded via Prince Nawwaf:
http://ift.tt/2sLEoeu

http://ift.tt/2sck1tW

£3,300,000,000 = The amount we got last year for arms exports to Saudi Arabia.

Wikileaks: Saudi Arabia’s rulers threatened to make it easier for terrorists to attack London unless corruption investigations into their arms deals were halted… told they faced “another 7/7” and the loss of “British lives on British Streets” if they pressed on with their enquiries.

Wahhabism (as part of the Salafi movement) = The ideological concept of destruction and terrorism (suicide bombings, indiscriminate attacks) which is the root of current home-grown terrorism. From Saudi Arabia. We have now sponsored it for years and years to come.

And to protect us…

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[MUST READ] Coca-Cola’s secret influence on medical and science journalists

Please read this article from the British Medical Journal: http://www.bmj.com/content/357/bmj.j1638

 

This is a very important argument, and it is essential for healthcare professionals, journalists and politicians alike to make a concerted and aggressive effort to kick these sugar-peddling companies out of the sphere of academic influence.

The more overt “More Doctors smoke…” advertisements of yesteryear are thankfully a thing of the past, but the covert influence of sugar-saturated food companies is no less a threat to our health. Aaron and Siegel (1) report that from 2011 to 2015, the Coca-Cola Company and PepsiCo were found to sponsor 95 national health organizations, many medical and public health institutions amongst them. They also lobbied against 29 public health bills intended to reduce soda consumption or improve nutrition.

The British Nutrition Foundation, for example, lists amongst “Sustaining Members” Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, Kellogg, Nestle, Tate & Lyle and has “Corporate Members” British Sugar plc, Mars UK, KP Snacks, McDonalds, United Biscuits, Weetabix, Ocean Spray and many more. Although it is open to companies and corporations from a variety of backgrounds including healthcare and fitness, the actual members who have provided support read as a Who’s Who of Sugar Salesmen (2), making their promise of a “a focus on objective nutrition science interpretation and delivery” open to scrutiny. The American Society for Nutrition is no different, with an almost-identical list of names cropping up (3) for this group, which publishes the Journal of Nutrition.

Indeed, the editorial boards of top nutrition journals are littered by corporate affiliations with sweetie companies – The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, for example, lists the likes of Mars, Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, Nestle, McDonald’s  and Ferrero amongst companies who have a relationship with members of their board (4). The ambassador’s reception may also be overflowing with hazelnut-and-wafer spherical treats at many other nutrition journals, who often  home of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, who have eight “corporate patron friends” and four “corporate sustaining friends.  (5)

It would be interesting to note how these journals consider submissions which report a detriment to health from these companies’ products, but when some of the largest nutrition journals display such a conflict of interest it must become clear to all that the Honey Pot relationship between “Big Food” and academia is poisonous and needs to be dealt with.

References:

(1) Sponsorship of National Health Organizations by Two Major Soda Companies. Aaron, Daniel G. et al. American Journal of Preventive Medicine , Volume 52 , Issue 1 , 20 – 30

(2) “Member Organisations – British Nutrition Foundation”. Nutrition.org.uk. N.p., 2017. Web. 10 Apr. 2017.

(3) “American Society For Nutrition – Our Sustaining Partners”. Nutrition.org. N.p., 2017. Web. 10 Apr. 2017.

(4) AJCN Editor Conflict of Interest Statement. (2017). Ajcn.nutrition.org. http://ajcn.nutrition.org/site/misc/EditorCOI.xhtml Web, 10 April. 2017.

(5) Nestle, Marion. Food Politics. 1st ed. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 2013. P112. Print.

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