The restorative power of hospital gardens

Florence Nightingale asserted in her landmark “Notes on Nursing” that the most challenging ordeal for a feverish patient is:

“not being able to see out of window, and the knots in the wood being the only view.  I shall never forget the rapture of fever patients over a bunch of bright-coloured flowers”.

In 1859, she was emphasizing the value of plants and space in the healing of patients:

“People say the effect is only on the mind. It is no such thing. The effect is on the body too”.

Nightingale was not alone in her appraisal of gardens and green spaces as therapeutic tools which were indispensable in the recovery process. Throughout Victorian and Edwardian periods, green spaces in hospitals were championed as havens for healing.  In the succeeding decades, this notion appears to have been forgotten as priorities in hospital construction were directed elsewhere, with little attention given to green spaces, and the replacement of park areas by car park areas.

Perhaps a renaissance was provoked following a 1984 study by American psychologist Roger Ulrich, who demonstrated that patients with views of trees and animals from their wards recovered faster after gallbladder surgery, and spent less time in hospital than those who had no such views.  In the UK, we are in the midst of re-appraising the role of gardens and green spaces, not just for patients but for staff and visitors as well.  The British Medical Association stressed in 2011 that hospital design should always make allowances for the important therapeutic role of gardens.

The Ninewells Community Garden isn’t just a space for rest and relaxation, but also provides a source of community spirit amongst volunteers, be they patients, staff or visitors. Credit: Ninewells Hospital Dundee

Remembering the history of these beautiful spaces, including the unique roles of specific colours and scents in therapy, helps guide the design of future hospital green spaces. In her book “Therapeutic Landscapes”, medical historian Dr Clare Hickman summarises how importantly hospital gardens were regarded, and the plans for new well-designed green spaces in the future, for example the upcoming Horatio’s Garden at Stoke Mandeville Hospital in Aylesbury.  

Painting classes at Horatio’s Garden with artist-in-residence Miranda Creswell. Credit: Horatio’s Garden, Salisbury

Whether they deliver a natural and calming scene from a patient’s bed, an accessible treat for the senses of a waiting visitor, or some relaxation, freedom and privacy for a staff nurse away from the wards, these spaces are once again being seen as crucial for health and wellbeing.   It is no surprise that a reclaimed boiler-house roof, now showpiece garden at Great Ormond Street Hospital designed by Chris Beardshaw, won a Gold Medal at last year’s RHS Chelsea Flower Show.

Hospital gardens need not be highly conceptualized spaces occupied by incongruous abstract sculptures and with little space to walk.  They can be triumphs if they are peaceful, interesting, accessible, well-maintained and engage the senses (though not too strongly).  Here are some beautiful, functional and peaceful hospital gardens across the UK.

                      Ten Hospital Gardens around the United Kingdom

The Morgan Stanley Garden for Great Ormond Street Hospital

The Morgan Stanley Garden for Great Ormond Street Hospital. Credit: JOHN CAMPBELL

Constructed by renowned garden designer Chris Beardshaw, this woodland-themed garden was transplanted from the RHS Chelsea Flower Show (where it won a Gold medal) to a disused roof space, surrounded by tall hospital buildings that look onto it.  The garden provides a quiet and peaceful space for childern and families, with a roof designed such that summer mornings will light up the sculpture of a child which is the centrepiece of the garden.

Horatio’s Garden at Salisbury District Hospital

A path for the senses at Horatio’s Garden, Salisbury. Credit: HORATIO’S GARDEN

Horatio’s Garden is a charity which makes gardens of sanctuary in centres for spinal injury. The gardens are named after Horatio Chapple, who came up with the idea alongside his father whilst volunteering in Salisbury. Horatio was tragically killed aged only 17, but his legacy endures in these beautiful gardens which combine a sensory and aesthetic feast with events and activities. For example, painting the scenic garden with artist-in-residence Miranda Creswell at Salisbury Hospital adds the extra element of creative and expressive arts therapy for patients suffering from spinal injuries.

Ninewells Community Garden, Dundee

A community spirit in action. Credit: NINEWELLS HOSPITAL

This huge community garden is overlooked by the Ninewells Hospital, and emphasizes a spirit of volunteer gardening for patients, staff and the local community.  The garden’s vegetable and sensory gardens, orchard, wildlife habitat and play areas offer a multitude of options for people to de-stress, recuperate and exercise. 

John Radcliffe Hospital Women’s Centre Garden, Oxford

Credit: John Radcliffe Hospital Women’s Centre Garden, Oxford

This discarded area adjacent to the Women’s Centre was transformed into an open space with a compact walking area and two subtle sculptures in the centre. Instead of the previous drab view in front of the building, the colourful array of flowers and scents of thyme and lavender provide a welcome area for female patients and staff to relax during the course of the day.

Horatio’s Garden at the Scottish National Spinal Injuries Unit, Glasgow

Credit: Horatio’s Garden, Glasgow

The second Horatio’s Garden on this list was inaugurated in August 2016, with views of the stunning woodland garden (above) from the hospital wards.  The garden has six distinct spaces, all of which serve to stimulate different senses, and a greenhouse which is surrounded by areas used for horticultural therapy activities.

Chase Farm Hospital Rehabilitation Gardens, Enfield

Credit: Chase Farm Hospital

Chase Farm Hospital has just renovated two of its areas into specialist therapeutic gardens aimed for the specific needs of patients, but open to staff and visitors. One of the gardens supports dementia patients, whilst the other (above) support stroke and rehabilitation patients. Based on a Japanese design, it provides a very compact but tranquil sanctuary within the hospital.

Guy’s Hospital Courtyard Garden, London

Credit: Guy’s Hospital, London

The contemporary feel of the courtyard garden at Guy’s Hospital in London is accentuated by the number of sitting areas amidst the shrubs and hedges, with the vindicated expectation that the garden was designed that the garden would become a preferred spot for having lunch or sitting with family outside the wards.

Bournemouth Hospital Orchard Garden, Bournemouth

A desolate tarmac courtyard in the hospital has only recently been revamped into a three-segmented garden: a therapeutic courtyard garden outside the chemotherapy suite (above), a sensory garden linking the courtyard to a lakeside garden, giving patients and visitors not only options for their retreat of choice, but also a large area to walk around and exercise in.

Chapel Garden, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich

A bland lightwell was transformed into this chapel garden, featuring a central “wish tree” and a number of water features such as a vertical water fountain and a water rill giving the impression of water moving continually throughout the garden.  The calming flow of water and illusion of space allow for, once again, a small and previously unused area becoming a peaceful reservation amidst the hospital.

Dick Vet Hospital Gardens, University of Edinburgh

Credit: University of Edinburgh

Animals, animal-owners and animal-lovers should not be excluded from the healing power of gardens.  This luscious retreat at the University of Edinburgh’s Easter Bush Campus provides ample space and quiet, together with several benches. It is capped off by the Path of Memories, a path lined by granite stones which can be engraved with an animal’s name.

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Seven of the UK’s healing hospital gardens — in pictures

https://www.theguardian.com/healthcare-network/gallery/2017/sep/12/seven-uks-healing-hospital-gardens-pictures

Article from The Guardian 12th September 2017:

Horatio’s Garden at Salisbury district hospital, Salisbury

Horatio’s Garden is a charity which creates gardens of sanctuary in centres for spinal injury. The gardens are named after Horatio Chapple who came up with the idea with his father while volunteering in Salisbury. Various events for patients with spinal injuries are held in the garden, such as painting classes with artist-in-residence Miranda Creswell.

 

The Chapel Garden, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital

This chapel garden features a central wish tree and a number of water features, such as a vertical fountain and a rill, which give the impression of water moving continually throughout the garden. The calming flow of water and the illusion of space have transformed this small and previously unused area of the hospital.

 
The Morgan Stanley garden, Great Ormond Street hospital, London

This woodland-themed garden, designed by Chris Beardshaw, was transplanted from the RHS Chelsea Flower Show (where it won a Gold medal) to a disused roof space, surrounded by tall hospital buildings that look onto it. The garden provides a quiet and peaceful space for children and families, the centrepiece of which is a sculpture of a child.

 
Ninewells community garden, Dundee

Patients, staff and the local community can volunteer at this garden. The vegetable and sensory gardens, orchard, wildlife habitat and play areas offer multiple options for people to de-stress, recuperate and exercise

 
Horatio’s Garden, Queen Elizabeth national spinal injuries unit, Glasgow

The second Horatio’s Garden on this list has six distinct spaces, all of which serve to stimulate different senses. There is also a greenhouse which is surrounded by areas used for horticultural therapy activities.

 
Chase Farm hospital rehabilitation gardens, London

Chase Farm hospital has renovated two areas into specialist therapeutic gardens for patients. One of the gardens supports dementia patients, while the other supports stroke and rehabilitation patients. Based on a Japanese design, the gardens are compact but tranquil sanctuary within the hospital, and are also open to staff and visitors

 
Bournemouth hospital garden, Bournemouth

A desolate tarmac courtyard in the hospital was revamped and made into a three-part garden. There is a therapeutic garden outside the chemotherapy suite, a sensory garden linking the courtyard to a lakeside garden, and a large area to walk around and exercise in.

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The Destruction of the NHS: A Dialogue at Breaking Point

The Destruction of the NHS: A Dialogue at Breaking Point

by Nima Ghadiri

Is the NHS at breaking point?

Yes, it really is. As things stand, it will not exist in five to ten years time, and different elements of our Health Service will be apportioned as Dialysis-Plus East Coast, CrossCancer, Virgin Maternity, or whatever other word-pasticcio the “brand positioner” regorges.

With consecutive governments in seemingly total denial about the state of the NHS, the phrase “crisis point” is an understatement. We need to do something now, every month which passes brings the death sentence closer.

Ok, just…. just chill out there for a second. Are things really THAT BAD?

Chucking about numbers is often a precursor to a well-known Disraeli quote, paraphrased by Mark Twain. Nevertheless, sometimes they are needed so people can grasp what is happening.

Since 2011, there has been a 504% increase in the number of patients waiting over four hours in A&E Departments across the country, forcing Secretary of State for Health Jeremy Hunt to ditch the target.   23 hospitals were simultaneously on black alert earlier this year, which means that they “are unable to guarantee life-saving emergency care”. This included Jeremy Hunt’s own local hospital The Royal Surrey, which had 27 patients urgently needing a bed but no space.

Waiting times for surgery have been getting much longer, and 4093 urgent operations were cancelled in 2016, an increase of 27% in just two years.  Knee and hip operations are now being rationed only for those who aren’t able to sleep because of agony, using bogus “pain tests” as a differentiator.

Cancer treatment targets have been missed for four consecutive years, and services are now failing.  Mental health services are being rationed, so people who suffer are dying in their homes, unable to care for themselves.

These are frightening figures, it’s no wonder the Red Cross (who stepped in early in the year to help with a shortage of ambulances) has declared the NHS a humanitarian crisis, as people are dying needlessly in the world’s fifth-richest country…

Stop, I get the idea, things are looking gloomy all round. Surely, we have the MONEY to stop this?

Source: BMA

Astonishingly, as demand has risen hugely, funding has been cut.  Our spending on the NHS as a percentage of our GDP has plummeted below 10%.  This is a lot less than France and Germany, and amongst the lowest in the developed world.

If our national health funding matched the average amount that Europe’s 10 leading economies spend on their healthcare, perhaps we could lose this uncoveted accolade:

Source: BMA

Yes, we need more NURSES and DOCTORS!

And we are getting far less.  Medical school applications have plummeted, the proportion of med school graduates who become first year doctors has gone down from 70% to 50%, with phrases such as “in droves” and “en masse” describing the number of junior doctors leaving the United Kingdom.  Enormous rota gaps are now ubiquitous, GP vacancies have skyrocketed from 2% in 2011 to 12.2% now, and 84% of general practitioners now say that their workload is affecting patient care.

Nursing applications have fallen by 23% over the last year, and the removal of bursary funding for student nurses and midwives has sent one clear message “We don’t value you”, underlined by years of below-inflation 0% and 1% pay rises.  By 2019, NHS workers will have seen their pay capped for nine consecutive years, and nurses will have seen their pay reduced by 12%.

To add salt into these raw and gaping wounds, the Secretary of State for Health massively over-estimated nurses’ average pay this month when he was asked why so many nurses are having to use food banks.

Source: British Medical Journal

So they want things to fail, is this all about PRIVATISATION?

We don’t need to speculate about this, it’s all there in numbers, contracts, even a book with Jeremy Hunt’s name on it, calling for the de-nationalisation of the NHS.  There has been an increase in spending on “independent sector providers” of a third between 2014 and 2016, and an estimated 500% more contracts have gone private since 2012.

Source: BMA

The plan for privatising the National Health Service isn’t exclusive to one party.  The groundwork was done by the previous government, with poorly conceived “public service reforms” leading to unfettered introduction of private corporations into commissioning. It has accelerated over recent years, however.

So what are the POLITICIANS saying?

Absolutely the wrong things. For a National Health Service which is quite visibly starving, Jeremy Hunt said: “The NHS needs to go on a 10-year diet”.

Theresa May also didn’t like the Red Cross assessment of the NHS, calling them “irresponsible” and “overblown”.

The BMA has identified five key issues for the future of the NHS, and it would indeed be “irresponsible” if politicians did not address these:

Source: BMA

Are you subtly telling me which way to VOTE?

No, it’s not for me to instruct you, and people don’t like being told what to do.  Nevertheless, it’s currently very easy for the mainstream media and tabloid press to distract the general population and report on fake scandals rather than one which is very real, and affects all of us.

As long as you are aware of what is happening and can make up your own mind, then that’s already very important. If you can spread the word to others, even better.  Over the next few months we will see an increase in grass-roots movements in social media and the streets, in support of the National Health Service.  There will be a nurses’ summer of protest activity, a show of anger against pay-rise caps and maltreatment which has left 40,000 posts unfilled.

Battling a Murdoch and Dacre Press which has vested interests against the NHS will be challenging, and no doubt lies will be spun which confuse and subvert.  Tabloid journalism had a pivotal role in the Junior Doctor contracts dispute, and may do so against the nurses too. It is crucial to appreciate that supporting our nurses means supporting our National Health Service.

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Armed Against the Undead: VR Zombie Thrills and Spills!

VR Zombie thrills and spills with guns and a chainsaw. Horror games in VR can sometimes be overly frightening – as in they create tachyarrhythmias. This has a nice balance between horror and humour which stops its from being too scary. I enjoyed it, although I did get stuck on a glitch.

Calories/hour: 231
Distance travelled: 684m
Average HR: 92 (range 77-119)

Find all the Virtual Reality reviews here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLkYBGegM5dQmeqL5SlZ19NOXFUlT9qBgM

Steam Curator site – essential HTC Vive games and applications:
http://store.steampowered.com/curator/27241299/

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Holodance: Dancing with Dragons in Virtual Reality!

Rhythm-based VR fitness games are ubiquitous, but each one seems to have its own niche feature. Holodance has dragons.

No seriously, it’s also very good. The rhythm mechanic rivals other VR rhythm fitness games: Audioshield, Beats Fever and Soundboxing.
Calories/hour: 348
Distance travelled: 2145m
Average HR: 97 (range 80-134)

Find all the Virtual Reality reviews here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLkYBGegM5dQmeqL5SlZ19NOXFUlT9qBgM

Steam Curator site – essential HTC Vive games and applications:
http://store.steampowered.com/curator/2724129

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Sairento: VR Ninja Skills with bullet-time.

This is a very ambitious game, with certain elements that can only be described as pure joy (the slow-motion/bullet-time). Mechanics for both sword and gun components are richly satisfying, and it compares well to Raw Data from Survios.

Nevertheless, it is a resources hog, and my graphics card perhaps wasn’t powerful enough to play it for sustained periods without stalling.

Calories/hour: 248
Distance travelled: 985
Average HR: 92 (range 71-108)

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