The Daily Mail Comments Section: A Study of one commenter – Jim

The Daily Mail is the most-read newspaper and news website in the United Kingdom. Paul Dacre’s newspaper has a remarkable power as kingmaker in British politics, and an extraordinary ability of influencing its readership.

The comments section gives an idea of the readership of the website, with both comments and like:dislike ratios hinting at what the current climate is.

A single user, Jim, has the following comments, all of which are popular amongst the DM readership:

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Welcome to Wangland

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/mar/27/eu-nurses-britain-brexit-poisoning-nhs

WELCOME TO WANGLAND:

We don’t need the European Union, the National Health Service, or any other outdated monolithic organisation.

You see, Britain is special, and will ALWAYS remain so. It’s what makes us expats when we move overseas, whereas people who come here are foreigners. The respect that we have means that we will always be lucrative trading partners for Australia, New Zealand, Canada and all our former colonies. If Scotland and Northern Ireland don’t like it, then to hell with them. The union of England and Wales (Wangland) can form strong alliances with our friends overseas and we will once again rule the waves.

Excelsior!

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Are Patients ‘At Risk From Thousands Of EU Medics?’

On 24th September 2016, the Daily Mail headlined with the following:

This follows on from a number of previous articles published earlier in the year by the paper concerning doctors in the NHS who come from other EU countries.

Whilst the paper has never been overly fastidious with the truth, this arrangement of falsehoods and scare-mongering is not only irresponsible but immeasurably dangerous to the National Health Service.

As a doctor who works in the NHS, I fear to imagine how we would manage if my colleagues from Ireland, Italy, Greece, Poland or Spain left their jobs as consultants, clinical fellows, registrars or house officers. It would certainly expand the existing staffing voids to breaking-point. The straightforward issue of workforce numbers aside, we would also lose the countless continental talent who contribute so much to our hospitals and research.

I wonder if Sophie Borland, the Health Correspondent for the Daily Mail, could visit hospital for a few days and witness first-hand the contribution of the 10% registered doctors and 4% registered nurses from other EU countries working in the NHS.

But what of the central premise of the Daily Mail’s campaign, that EU doctors work in the UK without safety checks and constitute a risk to the public? The Daily Mail quoted the head of the UK’s General Medical Council, Niall Dickson:

“Some European doctors – because we haven’t checked their competency – may struggle when they practise here and that could put patients at risk. We are able to assess their language skills but we cannot check their competency to practise. That’s just a reality.”

The article curiously missed out the following from the GMC: “UK patients are more protected than they used to be and the European Commission deserves credit for bringing in the fitness to practise alert mechanism, which allows regulators across Europe to share concerns about the fitness of practise of health professionals, and for giving the UK and regulators in the rest of Europe the power to require health professionals to demonstrate their ability to speak the language of their patients before granting them entry to practice.”

The GMC goes on to say “it is important to remember that employers also have a responsibility to carry out thorough pre-employment checks and make sure that the doctor is qualified and competent to carry out the duties they are being given, including having the right language skills for their particular role.”

This states the obvious: that the obligation lies with the employer for ensuring a rigorous application and interview process and then monitoring a doctor’s practice, and this should be the same whether the doctor is from the UK, Europe or the rest of the world.

However, the obvious can be ignored when a vendetta is being waged, and so the Daily Mail not only overlooks this but contraindicates itself by publishing the GMC figures:

“GMC figures for 2011 to 2015 show that just 0.55 per cent of doctors who qualified in the UK were struck off, suspended or given a warning. This compares with 1.01 per cent from the EU and 1.1 per cent from elsewhere in the world”, In summary, there was more action against non-EU doctors than EU doctors (and still a small proportion).

In a riposte to the Mail, the European Commission states in its article at blogs.ec.europa.eu: “It is out of the question that EU rules would require the UK to let linguistically or medically incompetent doctors practise. In fact, the rules – recently further reinforced in agreement with the UK – expressly require Member States to prevent such people from being employed”

This headline brings two negative consequences – firstly, patients become needlessly worried about EU doctors, which may lead to delays in seeking appropriate and timely care. Secondly, an incorrect stigma is fostered against a large group of doctors and nurses. Since Britain voted to leave the European Union, there has already been a marked reduction in applications from EU healthcare staff to work in the NHS. If those who come here from Europe and work to save lives and cure illnesses feel that they are no longer welcome and leave, then patients will really be at risk.

My article was originally posted on the Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/nima-ghadiri/are-patients-at-risk-from_b_12224216.html?

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Professor Stephen Hawking “Our attitude towards wealth played a crucial role in Brexit. We need a rethink”

Source: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jul/29/stephen-hawking-brexit-wealth-resources

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Money was a key factor in the outcome of the EU referendum. We will now have to learn to collaborate and to share

Does money matter? Does wealth make us rich any more? These might seem like odd questions for a physicist to try to answer, but Britain’s referendum decision is a reminder that everything is connected and that if we wish to understand the fundamental nature of the universe, we’d be very foolish to ignore the role that wealth does and doesn’t play in our society.

I argued during the referendum campaign that it would be a mistake for Britain to leave the European Union. I’m sad about the result, but if I’ve learned one lesson in my life it is to make the best of the hand you are dealt. Now we must learn to live outside the EU, but in order to manage that successfully we need to understand why British people made the choice that they did. I believe that wealth, the way we understand it and the way we share it, played a crucial role in their decision. As the prime minister, Theresa May, said in her first week in office: “We need to reform the economy to allow more people to share in the country’s prosperity.”

We all know that money is important. One of the reasons I believed it would be wrong to leave the EU was related to grants. British science needs all the money it can get, and one important source of such funding has for many years been the European commission. Without these grants, much important work would not and could not have happened. There is already some evidence of British scientists beingfrozen out of European projects, and we need the government to tackle this issue as soon possible.

Money is also important because it is liberating for individuals. I have spoken in the past about my concern that government spending cuts in the UK will diminish support for disabled students, support that helped me during my career. In my case, of course, money has helped not only make my career possible but has also literally kept me alive.

On one occasion while in Switzerland early on in my career, I developed pneumonia, and my college at Cambridge, Gonville and Caius, arranged to have me flown back to the UK for treatment. Without their money I might not have survived to do all the thinking that I’ve managed since then. Cash can set individuals free, just as poverty can certainly trap them and limit their potential, to their own detriment and that of the human race.

Paying for my care as a severely disabled man, and my work, is crucial; the acquisition of possessions is not.

So I would be the last person to decry the significance of money. However, although wealth has played an important practical role in my life, I have of course had a different relationship with it to most people. Paying for my care as a severely disabled man, and my work, is crucial; the acquisition of possessions is not. I don’t know what I would do with a racehorse, or indeed a Ferrari, even if I could afford one. So I have come to see money as a facilitator, as a means to an end – whether it is for ideas, or health, or security – but never as an end in itself.

Interestingly this attitude, for a long time seen as the predictable eccentricity of a Cambridge academic, is now more widely shared. People are starting to question the value of pure wealth. Is knowledge or experience more important than money? Can possessions stand in the way of fulfilment? Can we truly own anything, or are we just transient custodians?

These questions are leading to a shift in behaviour which, in turn, is inspiring some groundbreaking new enterprises and ideas. These are termed “cathedral projects”, the modern equivalent of the grand church buildings, constructed as part of humanity’s attempt to bridge heaven and Earth. These ideas are started by one generation with the hope a future generation will take up these challenges.

I hope and believe that people will embrace more of this cathedral thinking for the future, as they have done in the past, because we are in perilous times. Our planet and the human race face multiple challenges. These challenges are global and serious – climate change, food production, overpopulation, the decimation of other species, epidemic disease, acidification of the oceans. Such pressing issues will require us to collaborate, all of us, with a shared vision and cooperative endeavour to ensure that humanity can survive. We will need to adapt, rethink, refocus and change some of our fundamental assumptions about what we mean by wealth, by possessions, by mine and yours. Just like children, we will have to learn to share.

If we fail then the forces that contributed to Brexit, the envy and isolationism not just in the UK but around the world that spring from not sharing, of cultures driven by a narrow definition of wealth and a failure to divide it more fairly, both within nations and across national borders, will strengthen. If that were to happen, I would not be optimistic about the long-term outlook for our species.

But we can and will succeed. Humans are endlessly resourceful, optimistic and adaptable. We must broaden our definition of wealth to include knowledge, natural resources, and human capacity, and at the same time learn to share each of those more fairly. If we do this, then there is no limit to what humans can achieve together.

• Stephen Hawking recently launched www.unlimited.world

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