The Destruction of the NHS: A Dialogue at Breaking Point

The Destruction of the NHS: A Dialogue at Breaking Point

by Nima Ghadiri

Is the NHS at breaking point?

Yes, it really is. As things stand, it will not exist in five to ten years time, and different elements of our Health Service will be apportioned as Dialysis-Plus East Coast, CrossCancer, Virgin Maternity, or whatever other word-pasticcio the “brand positioner” regorges.

With consecutive governments in seemingly total denial about the state of the NHS, the phrase “crisis point” is an understatement. We need to do something now, every month which passes brings the death sentence closer.

Ok, just…. just chill out there for a second. Are things really THAT BAD?

Chucking about numbers is often a precursor to a well-known Disraeli quote, paraphrased by Mark Twain. Nevertheless, sometimes they are needed so people can grasp what is happening.

Since 2011, there has been a 504% increase in the number of patients waiting over four hours in A&E Departments across the country, forcing Secretary of State for Health Jeremy Hunt to ditch the target.   23 hospitals were simultaneously on black alert earlier this year, which means that they “are unable to guarantee life-saving emergency care”. This included Jeremy Hunt’s own local hospital The Royal Surrey, which had 27 patients urgently needing a bed but no space.

Waiting times for surgery have been getting much longer, and 4093 urgent operations were cancelled in 2016, an increase of 27% in just two years.  Knee and hip operations are now being rationed only for those who aren’t able to sleep because of agony, using bogus “pain tests” as a differentiator.

Cancer treatment targets have been missed for four consecutive years, and services are now failing.  Mental health services are being rationed, so people who suffer are dying in their homes, unable to care for themselves.

These are frightening figures, it’s no wonder the Red Cross (who stepped in early in the year to help with a shortage of ambulances) has declared the NHS a humanitarian crisis, as people are dying needlessly in the world’s fifth-richest country…

Stop, I get the idea, things are looking gloomy all round. Surely, we have the MONEY to stop this?

Source: BMA

Astonishingly, as demand has risen hugely, funding has been cut.  Our spending on the NHS as a percentage of our GDP has plummeted below 10%.  This is a lot less than France and Germany, and amongst the lowest in the developed world.

If our national health funding matched the average amount that Europe’s 10 leading economies spend on their healthcare, perhaps we could lose this uncoveted accolade:

Source: BMA

Yes, we need more NURSES and DOCTORS!

And we are getting far less.  Medical school applications have plummeted, the proportion of med school graduates who become first year doctors has gone down from 70% to 50%, with phrases such as “in droves” and “en masse” describing the number of junior doctors leaving the United Kingdom.  Enormous rota gaps are now ubiquitous, GP vacancies have skyrocketed from 2% in 2011 to 12.2% now, and 84% of general practitioners now say that their workload is affecting patient care.

Nursing applications have fallen by 23% over the last year, and the removal of bursary funding for student nurses and midwives has sent one clear message “We don’t value you”, underlined by years of below-inflation 0% and 1% pay rises.  By 2019, NHS workers will have seen their pay capped for nine consecutive years, and nurses will have seen their pay reduced by 12%.

To add salt into these raw and gaping wounds, the Secretary of State for Health massively over-estimated nurses’ average pay this month when he was asked why so many nurses are having to use food banks.

Source: British Medical Journal

So they want things to fail, is this all about PRIVATISATION?

We don’t need to speculate about this, it’s all there in numbers, contracts, even a book with Jeremy Hunt’s name on it, calling for the de-nationalisation of the NHS.  There has been an increase in spending on “independent sector providers” of a third between 2014 and 2016, and an estimated 500% more contracts have gone private since 2012.

Source: BMA

The plan for privatising the National Health Service isn’t exclusive to one party.  The groundwork was done by the previous government, with poorly conceived “public service reforms” leading to unfettered introduction of private corporations into commissioning. It has accelerated over recent years, however.

So what are the POLITICIANS saying?

Absolutely the wrong things. For a National Health Service which is quite visibly starving, Jeremy Hunt said: “The NHS needs to go on a 10-year diet”.

Theresa May also didn’t like the Red Cross assessment of the NHS, calling them “irresponsible” and “overblown”.

The BMA has identified five key issues for the future of the NHS, and it would indeed be “irresponsible” if politicians did not address these:

Source: BMA

Are you subtly telling me which way to VOTE?

No, it’s not for me to instruct you, and people don’t like being told what to do.  Nevertheless, it’s currently very easy for the mainstream media and tabloid press to distract the general population and report on fake scandals rather than one which is very real, and affects all of us.

As long as you are aware of what is happening and can make up your own mind, then that’s already very important. If you can spread the word to others, even better.  Over the next few months we will see an increase in grass-roots movements in social media and the streets, in support of the National Health Service.  There will be a nurses’ summer of protest activity, a show of anger against pay-rise caps and maltreatment which has left 40,000 posts unfilled.

Battling a Murdoch and Dacre Press which has vested interests against the NHS will be challenging, and no doubt lies will be spun which confuse and subvert.  Tabloid journalism had a pivotal role in the Junior Doctor contracts dispute, and may do so against the nurses too. It is crucial to appreciate that supporting our nurses means supporting our National Health Service.

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Dying with Indignity in Iran

Published on: https://iranwire.com/en/blogs/693/4344

In this guest blog, Dr Nima Ghadiri describes the harrowing experience of the end-of-life care his grandmother received in an Iranian hospital, and the betrayal of the principles of bioethics, which were first identified many centuries ago by Iranian polymaths, including Avicenna and Razi.

Avicenna (left) and Razi (right), Persian physicians and polymaths who helped define the principles of bioethics, used by healthcare professionals to this day

My beloved grandmother and closest friend Batool Sepassi died in an Iranian Hospital ICU (Intensive Care Unit) following a short illness.

During the course of a viral illness, she became increasingly short of breath and had to be admitted to a local private hospital. She had a chest infection and was taken to the intensive care unit accompanied by close family. At this point the family had separated to go to the payment desk, and my grandmother was taken to ICU, though no medical history was taken nor treatment started until payment was organized (the privilege of private healthcare).

There were some major flaws in treatment. Having been admitted with a chest problem, it took 30 hours for a chest consultant to see my grandmother, though not without a battle — we were told “this patient is not on my list” — and a serviceable X-ray was only taken the following day.

My family was only allowed an hour a day to visit my grandmother, which was extremely hard given that she thrived on closeness to family and friends. My close relatives stayed outside all day the ICU to be able to glance at my grandmother from a distance and hear her calling out for them. This was a traumatic experience, particularly when they heard the expressions “Saaket” or “Khafeh Sho” (“Shut up”) from my grandmother when she was undergoing procedures. My grandmother loved to communicate and form bonds with people, and appreciated having her close ones hold her hand during medical procedures. During all of her stay, her arm was outstretched to hold someone’s hand, but there was no one there and her hands were eventually fastened to the bed.

The course of the disease was unpredictable, and ultimately a poor prognosis was given, i.e. the chances of my grandmother’s survival diminished. During this period, interactions with nurses and doctors were punctuated by disregard and dismissal. For example, when one relative noticed that the nebulisers were inserted in my grandmother’s eyes rather than her nostrils (where they belong), this fact was dismissed with a “oh, her oxygen was high”. There were a few good doctors and nurses, but they were conspicuously outnumbered by the poor ones. When my cousin objected against intubation (insertion of a tube into the lungs) for the last few hours of life, instead of explaining the rationale, the doctor shouted at her “Do you want to kill your grandmother?” It took a lot of pressure to prevent the ICU team from doing a completely needless invasive procedure (kidney dialysis) with just a few hours of life remaining and kidney test results that had been unchanged for years.

Nevertheless, simple measures such as giving my grandmother something to drink were considered a luxury. When my grandmother was deteriorating, no provision was made to allow her to be close to loved ones. She and her family did not want her to be in an intensive care unit, and not only was she kept there against her will during the treatment phase, but she was kept there when she was about to die.

I asked my cousin to connect her to me by video call before her death during the one-hour visiting period. Her eyes were initially closed, but as soon as she heard my voice, they opened wide. Her mouth was entirely bandaged apart from a tube coming out of it, but I could see the outline of her lips moving briskly underneath all the bandages. She wanted to say something, and had never been stopped from talking to me before. She started vigorously shaking her tied arms in an attempt to communicate with me, but then realized her efforts were fruitless and her eyes started welling up with tears. In all my years of knowing her, I don’t remember her crying. She died just over an hour later, curtains drawn and no loved ones around her.

Nothing could have prepared me for this image, which remains traumatically imprinted in my mind. It will be a memory I will never forget. I keep wondering what she wanted to say – was she saying goodbye to me, or asking me to convey a message: to look after my mother, my brother, or help someone desperately in need? Finding the answer to this is a futile quest, but it is a rumination that will, sadly, remain.

Dying alone, with family not allowed to be with her is one thing, but my family were also denied the chance to see her after death. Only after begging were they able to get a brief glimpse of her in the corridor prior to entering the mortuary after challenging the comment, “She’s gone, why don’t you just go now”.

Passing away is an inevitable part of people’s existence, but the environment for this chapter of life is so important. As a doctor who works in the United Kingdom’s National Health Service, I have been well-versed in the importance of dignity in death. But in Iran, a country whose polymaths helped define the early principles of bioethics, it is unfathomable that core bioethical values were denied for such a sweet soul as my grandmother, and potentially for others. These principles include Non-Maleficence — not performing unnecessary procedures that serve just to prolong the patient’s life and often cause distress and pain to the patient — and Autonomy – respect for the desires and values of the patient, including how they want to be treated and how they want to die.

In my grandmother’s case this was with her family around her and without fruitless procedures. Denying someone’s spirit and character so manifestly in their final days and hours is criminal. These sentiments were shared by my family, and indeed being able to spend time with a loved one before and after their death to say goodbye should be a basic right, rather than just being able to observe this sorrowful moment from a distance. It should not be such as Sisyphean effort to spend time with a loved one and find out what happened during a hospital stay, hampered at all stages by a lack of sympathy and empathy alongside a degree of ageism against someone who is perceived as just a bed number rather than a human being.

A photo of Nima Ghadiri’s grandmother holding a pomegranate on Shab-e Yalda (An ancient Persian festival commemorating the Winter Solstice), three weeks before she died

I remain always indebted to my grandmother for looking after me as a child in the United Kingdom and being someone I could talk to and share my life with for so much of my existence. Even at her age, she had the spirit of someone many decades younger, was full of life and brought joy to so many. She shared all she had with charity and those less fortunate than herself. Strangers often commented on how sweet and bright she was and I used to talk to her about films, technology and current affairs. She remained a fountain of wisdom and I could not have dreamt of a better grandmother. Her grandchildren remain traumatized by the manner in which she has gone, and the suffering and abuse that she endured. Because she was such a positive and life-loving soul, I do not want the final page of her life to be negative. I am not sure how yet, but I know that I would be happy if the discussion arises for Iran, the country of Avicenna, Razi and numerous others, to re-discover what care, particularly at the end of life, means. Perhaps in the future, I will open a palliative care institute in her name.

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Doctors With Mental Illness – Time For A Change

Mental Illness, particularly in the workplace, remains a stigma. It is time for attitudes toward mental illness to change, and we cannot ignore the doctors who suffer.

A push for mental health

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/prime-minister-pledges-a-revolution-in-mental-health-treatment

Earlier this year, former prime minister David Cameron pledged a mental health revolution of almost a billion pounds. Whilst this proposed outlay is welcome, it must be matched by a proactive change to the stigma attached to mental health in media, the workplace, and at home.

Mental health and doctors

 

Professor Debbie Cohen of Cardiff surveyed almost 2000 doctors this year and found that 60% had experienced mental illness in the UK (82% in England alone). In the general population, the rate is 28%. Doctors experience the same range of problems as everyone else, but the cocktail of work, exams, academia, family and relationships lowers the threshold for illness. Many have perfectionist traits which lead to doubt and self-criticism when things go wrong, leading to a self-perpetuating cycle.

Worryingly, more young doctors are being diagnosed with mental health problems. There may not be a pre-existing illness: After 25-year old junior doctor Rose Polge tragically committed suicide in February 2016, her family described a young lady with an infectious enthusiasm for life and no previous mental health problems, but long hours and work-related anxiety contributed to her decision to end her life.

Extreme stress early on

 

Doctors are as susceptible to mental problems as the general population. However, particularly early on in their careers, they face a unique combination of challenges. These include the need to develop countless skills within a short period (for which university education can never fully prepare) and service burdens in a chronically under-resourced environment, only more challenging for those with family or caring roles. Early junior doctors shifts are usually incompatible with outside interests, and losing day-to-day balance can unearth mental health struggles.

Doctors face a societal and professional weight compelling them to ignore difficulties. A cultural idiosyncracy of willing martyrdom exists, in which doctors feel it their role to attend work regardless of fitness. This is less prevalent in other countries, for example Australia and New Zealand, where attitudes towards sickness are more rational.

The stigma

 

Fewer professions stigmatise mental health disorders more prominently than medicine. In the Cardiff study, 41% of doctors with mental illness said that they would not disclose it. Doctors are not supposed to get ill, and seeking help is weakness which imperils trust in the practitioner’s ability to do his/her job. This featured in the heartbreaking suicide of GP Wendy Potts in November 2015 after a patient read her blog on living with Bipolar Disorder and complained to the surgery.

Some doctors find changing roles from helper to patient unnatural, others find treatment from a colleague embarrassing. Often the prevailing fear is of a career-threatening “black mark” on a permanent record: Doctors must labour through appraisals and assessments, and competition for jobs and training posts can be ferocious.

A culture of fear

 

A 2008 Department of Health report said:

“Doctors may fear that acknowledging the need for help will damage their career prospects or lead to scrutiny of their fitness to practise”

This happened in the case of Dr Dakhsha Emson, who killed herself and her baby during a relapse of bipolar disorder in 2000. A stirring tribute from her husband reflected a talented doctor and a successful medical career. However, worry of colleagues and patients finding out when she was applying for consultant posts led to a lack of treatment. The report highlighted a:

“Widespread stigma against mental illness in the NHS”

This stigma can arise as early as medical school, fostered by a triad of competitiveness, fear and uncertainty. Students sometimes receive conflicting information about mental health, and may fear disclosing illness. Pastoral care can be arbitrary, often with little demarcation between disciplinary roles and support roles. Some universities have introduced “fitness to practice” hearings to monitor student behaviour, fostering a culture of castigation.

For some doctors, this culture is epitomised by the General Medical Council (GMC), whose role is to protect the health and safety of the public. All doctors with mental health issues are required to notify regarding their problems, which are investigated under the same procedures as misconduct and poor performance. Subsequent fitness to practise processes are required to be declared on application forms for jobs. These can sometimes be beneficial, for example recommending support. However, often they are described as harrowing experiences, and the duress of investigation affects doctors personally and professionally.

The toll can sometimes be too much, between 2005 and 2013 there were 28 reported cases of suicides following investigation. One of those was GP Belinda Brewe, describing the process:

“threatening and isolating”, eroding “self-confidence and self-belief”.

What’s needed

 
  • The NHS needs continued active campaigns to encourage openness, tackle stigma and promote healthy working practice.
  • Medical schools should be proactive in support and awareness: counselling services, pastoral care positions and peer support.
  • The insight that doctors with mental health problems have when treating their patients should be valued.

A doctor who has a mental health disorder might put his patient at risk, but a doctor hiding or in denial because of a culture of fear will put his patient at risk.

Support

  • http://www.php.nhs.uk NHS Practitioner Health Programme, free and confidential health service allowing doctors to self-refer.

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/nima-ghadiri/doctors-with-mental-healt_b_12760924.html

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“Oh stop moaning about your job, It was worse in my day”

                  “120-hour weeks we worked”                  

stream_img_66358962_alcmp61puMxbd9LL._UX250_

                                               “Fell asleep whilst clerking in a patient!

This Argumentum ad Populum type of logic in an argument about a job or job proposal is unacceptable in any line of work, from astrophysicist to zebra feeder. However, this is particularly toxic in our line of work as doctors, as there are some former doctors who are especially loud and saturate the realms of politics and media with this outlook. Thankfully, there are far more senior doctors who don’t have this attitude. This is intended towards the first group.

Dear former doctor, thank you for all you have done in service of our nation’s health. But….

• In your day, interns had free hospital accommodation

• In your day, your salary went a whole lot further, and many of you were able to pay off your mortgages.

• In your day, junior doctors lived and worked together and provided a network and coping mechanism in times of difficulty. There was a “firm” culture where health staff were a team.

• In your day, nurses had the time and authority to deal with many issues themselves instead of having to spend almost their entire shift completing paperwork.

• In your day, junior doctors did not graduate with close to £100,000 of student loans to pay.

• In your day, doctors had a ridonculous final salary pension to look forward to.

• In your day, your working life was often not left to be dictated on the whim of management or human resources. In fact, there was no management or human resources.

• In your day, junior doctors from Australia, New Zealand and North America used to flock en masse to the United Kingdom, not just for Fellowship posts for Specialist Training. Why doesn’t this happen any more?   Why is there such disparity between ourselves and our peer countries that so many junior doctors have applied to go overseas, when it was once the other way round? Does that not tell you something about how things are comparatively?

Even if junior doctors were working their feet skinless in the pits of hell in your day, why does that matter?  You are justifying the unjust, by saying the past was worse. And shame on you.

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