Saudi Arabia’s takeover of British politics will be complete with the Tory-DUP Coalition

Saudi Arabia’s takeover of British politics is complete following the Tory-DUP coalition (as they have a more direct financial link with the DUP)

DUP Referendum campaign funded via Prince Nawwaf:
https://www.opendemocracy.net/…/secretive-dup-brexit-donor-…

http://www.independent.co.uk/…/election-dup-brexit-donation…

£3,300,000,000 = The amount we got last year for arms exports to Saudi Arabia.

Wikileaks: Saudi Arabia’s rulers threatened to make it easier for terrorists to attack London unless corruption investigations into their arms deals were halted… told they faced “another 7/7” and the loss of “British lives on British Streets” if they pressed on with their enquiries.

Wahhabism (as part of the Salafi movement) = The ideological concept of destruction and terrorism (suicide bombings, indiscriminate attacks) which is the root of current home-grown terrorism. From Saudi Arabia. We have now sponsored it for years and years to come.

And to protect us…

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The Destruction of the NHS: A Dialogue at Breaking Point

The Destruction of the NHS: A Dialogue at Breaking Point

by Nima Ghadiri

Is the NHS at breaking point?

Yes, it really is. As things stand, it will not exist in five to ten years time, and different elements of our Health Service will be apportioned as Dialysis-Plus East Coast, CrossCancer, Virgin Maternity, or whatever other word-pasticcio the “brand positioner” regorges.

With consecutive governments in seemingly total denial about the state of the NHS, the phrase “crisis point” is an understatement. We need to do something now, every month which passes brings the death sentence closer.

Ok, just…. just chill out there for a second. Are things really THAT BAD?

Chucking about numbers is often a precursor to a well-known Disraeli quote, paraphrased by Mark Twain. Nevertheless, sometimes they are needed so people can grasp what is happening.

Since 2011, there has been a 504% increase in the number of patients waiting over four hours in A&E Departments across the country, forcing Secretary of State for Health Jeremy Hunt to ditch the target.   23 hospitals were simultaneously on black alert earlier this year, which means that they “are unable to guarantee life-saving emergency care”. This included Jeremy Hunt’s own local hospital The Royal Surrey, which had 27 patients urgently needing a bed but no space.

Waiting times for surgery have been getting much longer, and 4093 urgent operations were cancelled in 2016, an increase of 27% in just two years.  Knee and hip operations are now being rationed only for those who aren’t able to sleep because of agony, using bogus “pain tests” as a differentiator.

Cancer treatment targets have been missed for four consecutive years, and services are now failing.  Mental health services are being rationed, so people who suffer are dying in their homes, unable to care for themselves.

These are frightening figures, it’s no wonder the Red Cross (who stepped in early in the year to help with a shortage of ambulances) has declared the NHS a humanitarian crisis, as people are dying needlessly in the world’s fifth-richest country…

Stop, I get the idea, things are looking gloomy all round. Surely, we have the MONEY to stop this?

Source: BMA

Astonishingly, as demand has risen hugely, funding has been cut.  Our spending on the NHS as a percentage of our GDP has plummeted below 10%.  This is a lot less than France and Germany, and amongst the lowest in the developed world.

If our national health funding matched the average amount that Europe’s 10 leading economies spend on their healthcare, perhaps we could lose this uncoveted accolade:

Source: BMA

Yes, we need more NURSES and DOCTORS!

And we are getting far less.  Medical school applications have plummeted, the proportion of med school graduates who become first year doctors has gone down from 70% to 50%, with phrases such as “in droves” and “en masse” describing the number of junior doctors leaving the United Kingdom.  Enormous rota gaps are now ubiquitous, GP vacancies have skyrocketed from 2% in 2011 to 12.2% now, and 84% of general practitioners now say that their workload is affecting patient care.

Nursing applications have fallen by 23% over the last year, and the removal of bursary funding for student nurses and midwives has sent one clear message “We don’t value you”, underlined by years of below-inflation 0% and 1% pay rises.  By 2019, NHS workers will have seen their pay capped for nine consecutive years, and nurses will have seen their pay reduced by 12%.

To add salt into these raw and gaping wounds, the Secretary of State for Health massively over-estimated nurses’ average pay this month when he was asked why so many nurses are having to use food banks.

Source: British Medical Journal

So they want things to fail, is this all about PRIVATISATION?

We don’t need to speculate about this, it’s all there in numbers, contracts, even a book with Jeremy Hunt’s name on it, calling for the de-nationalisation of the NHS.  There has been an increase in spending on “independent sector providers” of a third between 2014 and 2016, and an estimated 500% more contracts have gone private since 2012.

Source: BMA

The plan for privatising the National Health Service isn’t exclusive to one party.  The groundwork was done by the previous government, with poorly conceived “public service reforms” leading to unfettered introduction of private corporations into commissioning. It has accelerated over recent years, however.

So what are the POLITICIANS saying?

Absolutely the wrong things. For a National Health Service which is quite visibly starving, Jeremy Hunt said: “The NHS needs to go on a 10-year diet”.

Theresa May also didn’t like the Red Cross assessment of the NHS, calling them “irresponsible” and “overblown”.

The BMA has identified five key issues for the future of the NHS, and it would indeed be “irresponsible” if politicians did not address these:

Source: BMA

Are you subtly telling me which way to VOTE?

No, it’s not for me to instruct you, and people don’t like being told what to do.  Nevertheless, it’s currently very easy for the mainstream media and tabloid press to distract the general population and report on fake scandals rather than one which is very real, and affects all of us.

As long as you are aware of what is happening and can make up your own mind, then that’s already very important. If you can spread the word to others, even better.  Over the next few months we will see an increase in grass-roots movements in social media and the streets, in support of the National Health Service.  There will be a nurses’ summer of protest activity, a show of anger against pay-rise caps and maltreatment which has left 40,000 posts unfilled.

Battling a Murdoch and Dacre Press which has vested interests against the NHS will be challenging, and no doubt lies will be spun which confuse and subvert.  Tabloid journalism had a pivotal role in the Junior Doctor contracts dispute, and may do so against the nurses too. It is crucial to appreciate that supporting our nurses means supporting our National Health Service.

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“Nazi Germany of the early 1920s” Snapshot of UK Newspapers 5th October 2016

papers

My boss is of Jewish origin, his parents emigrating from Germany and Poland. He lost relatives in Auschwitz.  He is a phenomenally loyal NHS Doctor. Earlier in the year he said that the language being used by media and politicians is eerily resembling 1920-30s Germany and the rise of the Nazi party.  I wasn’t paying too much attention, but I valued his statement as he is a remarkable observationalist .

He was right, this style of rhetoric and the undercurrent behind the statements echoes Das Reich and Das Shwarze Korps. I’ve never employed Godwin’s law before – but we are veering on the abyss which leads to National Socialism.

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Studying The Kiwis: Could Britain’s Junior Doctors Learn From New Zealand?

As the British Medical Association (BMA) prepares for another meeting to discuss further industrial action against the government’s proposed junior doctor contract, the New Zealand Resident Doctor’s Association (NZRDA) has also announced a campaign for a better contract for junior doctors, with the threat of strikes on the horizon. Can British Doctors and their union learn from New Zealand?
Following a year-long stalemate punctuated by brief periods of attrition, Britain’s junior doctors remain locked in a dispute with the government over a proposed new contract, warning of “escalated” industrial action should the Government refuse to address concerns over patient safety and fairness. This is likely to encompass a rolling programme of strikes, starting in September. The BMA Junior Doctors Committee claim that worries have been repeatedly raised and not addressed, including concerns about weekend working and pay for those working less than full time.

JDC chair Ellen McCourt has said:

“Forcing a contract on junior doctors in which they don’t have confidence, that they don’t feel is good for their patients or themselves, is not something they can accept”.

Echoing events in Britain, New Zealand’s Resident Doctors Association (NZRDA) called for changes to junior doctor working patterns, including the number of potential consecutive 10-hour night shifts to be reduced from seven to four, and the number of consecutive day shifts to be reduced from 12 to 10.

The campaign is focusing entirely on patient safety and has centred on a strong social media presence with clear statements and images:

http://www.nzrda.org.nz/

Highly publicized figures from NZRDA’s survey of its 3600 members reported that 300 doctors had fallen asleep behind the wheel on the way back from work, and more than 1000 doctors had made a mistake which affected patient care due to exhaustion. The NZRDA has warned that if there are no changes to rosters, there will be industrial action for the third time after previous strikes in 1992 and 2006.

http://www.newshub.co.nz

The NZRDA was originally founded in 1985. In contrast to Britain’s BMA it represents only Junior Doctors, not all doctors. British doctors moving to New Zealand are often surprised about the power and proactive nature of the organisation. The face of the NZRDA for the last few decades has been the organisation’s National Secretary Dr Deborah Powell. She is perceived by doctors, media and public alike as a fiery and uncompromising battleaxe who persistently wields clout in negotiations.

http://www.nzrda.org.nz/

These negotiations have yielded a number of benefits over time for junior doctors in New Zealand, which have included: consistent increases in pay, final year medical students being given a salary, free canteen food during working hours, training and membership costs being covered, presence of cross-cover and relief doctors to cover short-term absences, ease in going out-of-training for family or travel. There is even a motivation for hospitals and clinics to ensure that their junior doctors claim all of their annual and study leave, as the amount not used becomes “cashed out” as a payment.

In the few instances when conditions have deteriorated, the NZRDA has been aggressive. In April 2008, they gave notice of a nationwide 48-hour strike over pay, conditions and ongoing issues of retention, as 40% of Kiwi doctors were moving to Australia. At the time, a first year house-surgeon in NZ earned 88,000 NZD (£40,000) on average. Junior doctors sought a 10% pay rise over three consecutive years (twice that of other health service workers) rather than two rises of 4% over two years.

The strikes were widely seen as a success which brought the desired outcome for the doctors, caused no harm to patients (indeed, emergency department waiting times were markedly reduced), has improved retention of doctors and made New Zealand a very attractive destination for British and other doctors. They have also underlined the power of the NZRDA to fight annually for better conditions.

http://www.saferhours.co.nz/
The success of these victories is reflected by a reversal in the exodus of Kiwi doctors to the United Kingdom, such that British doctors are now flocking to New Zealand at record levels. We can only speculate whether a single-minded force such as Deborah Powell may have challenged the various events which have taken place over the last decade and reduced morale of British junior doctors to such an extent: Loss of House Officer Accommodation, shortages of training posts, the ill-received Medical Training Application System (MTAS), pay increases below inflation, consistently increasing GMC and examination fees.

How would the NZRDA manage if metaphorically transplanted onto the negotiating table closer to home? Their use of punchy statements and images, peppered with some humour, has helped the public clearly identify the junior doctors’ argument. Based on their track record, would they have hesitated to legally challenge the UK government: particularly on Jeremy Hunt’s early assertion that we do not already have a seven-day emergency NHS, a proclamation which has already led to well-documented patient harm?

http://www.saferhours.co.nz/

Watching the British and New Zealand negotiations developing in parallel will be an interesting comparison of the relative power of government and employers’ union in both countries.

Also published here: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/nima-ghadiri/new-zealand-junior-doctors-uk_b_11675406.html

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Classic analysis on the rules of sport by Alan Partridge in his audiobook I, Partridge: We Need to Talk About Alan.

“Sport, on the other hand, is straightforward. In badminton, if you win a rally, you get one point. In volleyball, if you win a rally, you get one point. In tennis, if you win a rally, you get 15 points for the first or second rallies you’ve won in that game, or 10 for the third, with an indeterminate amount assigned to the fourth rally other than the knowledge that the game is won, providing one player is two 10-point (or 15-point) segments clear of his opponent. It’s clear and simple”

All rights belong to Steve Coogan, Neil Gibbons, Rob Gibbons and Armando Iannucci

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